AUSTIN, Texas – Jeremy Nail spins stories with a novelist’s eye (“Clarksville”) and poet’s heart (“Second Wind”). Witness Ghost of Love. The rapidly rising songwriter’s new collection simply spotlights an artist in peak form (the title track). The album frequently delivers vivid snap shots as wildly cinematic (“Nothing But a Song”) as they are carefully chiseled (“Windmill”). Grace and gratitude map the journey (“Angels Will Fall”). “Ghost of Love is a haunted record, filled with kind, gracious ghosts that tug at your sleeve,” says legendary singer-songwriter Jon Dee Graham (The Skunks, True Believers). “The record is a sonically seamless study in musical restraint.” 

     

Accordingly, Nail's ethereal narratives stand oak strong. “We fall into the space where body and soul become one,” he sings on the album’s title track. “Here in your embrace, I'm giving up the ghost of love.” Few songwriters frame human connection as clearly and economically. “Lyrically, this record is an understated wonder, someone telling you something really important but in a very quiet and controlled voice so that you really have to listen,” Graham says. “Start with ‘Nothing But a Song’ and work your way in either direction. You won’t be disappointed.”

     

Nail succinctly captures the record's spirit. “The theme of this record deals with an individuals path toward wholeness when the comfort of old ghosts suddenly fall away,” he explains. “Like these songs, the moments of our lives are a balance of light and shadow. Many of the lyrics came subconsciously, whether it was a dream or just letting my mind wander. I've had some personal upheaval in my life the last few years, and music is one way I attempt to process and try come to a place of understanding.”


The longtime Austin resident delivers equal measures heart and hope throughout. Life lessons slide subtly through side doors. “I learned a lot from working with Alejandro Escovedo,” says Nail, who was raised by a family of ranchers and fine art purveyors in Albany, Texas. “He really talked about leaving space in songs and helped me write from a different starting point. I think music is really satisfying when you leave some room and let you take what you want from it instead of being a strict story. I found myself with the space for these songs to come and I wrote them from a subconscious place, but it's not necessarily autobiographical. I really wanted to let the listener put themselves in the songs.” 


Ghost of Love follow's Nail's internationally acclaimed Escovedo-produced My Mountain (2016), a sharply written album conveying an intensely personal journey that stemmed from his battle with a rare form of cancer (sarcoma) which resulted in an amputated leg. The collection was nominated by the 15th annual Independent Music Awards in the alt-country album category and the Austin American-Statesman pegged Nail as its artist of the month in May 2016. Raves poured in from both sides of the pond. “Nail's sound is superbly profound,” Elmore magazine proclaimed, “dancing along the lines of Ryan Bingham and a Stetson-clad Beck.” Even better: “Pastoral and Poetic, Live Oak (2018) finds the native Texan ever reflective and resilient,” the Austin Chronicle noted about Nail's most recent album, “breathing in life's landscapes, literal and figurative, and exhaling a peaceful sense of place.”


For more information, please contact Jenni Finlay, Jenni Finlay Promotions, jenni@jennifinlay.com